Projects

Current Projects

Cote d’Ivoire ELT Exchange

As part of my work as an English Language Fellow at IPNETP, I am designing a three-pronged continuing professional development program for Ivorian English teachers, called the Cote d’Ivoire ELT Exchange. The first phase of the project is teaching workshops for in-service English teachers at ten focus schools throughout Abidjan, on topics identified during a needs analysis that included discussions with teachers and class observations. The second phase is the creation of a website and online course, which will make the content of the in-school workshops available to teachers throughout the country. The final component is the planning of the first national ELT conference, in collaboration with several local teachers’ associations. The goal of the project is to foster a culture of continuing professional development for Ivorian teachers.

YALI English for Leadership Classes

This is a course I have designed for the Andrew Young Center for Entrepreneurship, an American Space connected to the US Embassy, to teach English and leadership skills to intermediate and advanced learners. It uses materials from the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) and covers topics related to personal development and social issues. Each class centers around a YALI video and a related high-level language point to help students refine their English.

Social Responsibility Interest Section Newsletter

I am currently co-editor of the newsletter for TESOL International’s Social Responsibility Interest Section. We publish 4 issues a year, on various themes related to social justice and English language teaching. If you would like to write for the newsletter, please read the submission guidelines and get in touch. Past issues are available online here.

Past Projects

Drama and Storytelling Project

This project was a collaboration between myself and Catherine Njau, a Tanzanian colleague and founder of the Kuleana Group. I designed the curriculum for an extracurricular program focused on multilingual storytelling, digital publishing and dramatization and provided long-distance support as Ms. Njau implemented the project at a secondary school in Tanzania. The students explored both oral and written storytelling techniques and then created their own stories. The students translated their stories (into English, Swahili and Chagga) and published them on the African Storybook Project, then dramatized them and performed the plays for the school community. Myself and Ms. Njau will present about the project at TESOL 2018 in Chicago.

Multiple Intelligences Project

This is a project I started for my fellowship in Ecuador. I researched the ways Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory has been adopted both internationally and in Ecuador, and developed teaching activities related to each of the eight intelligences. This lead to student test scores increasing 1.38 points on a ten point scale. I plan to adapt the project for implementation in a Tanzanian secondary school next, and will present the project at TESOL 2018 in Chicago.

Community Action Theatre Project

In Tanzania, I worked on two collaborative theatre pieces with my students, using a process called Community Action Theatre. The students created plays about issues the were important to them, such as early marriage and girls’ education, and performed them for the community. I wrote an article about the process and the way the girls used it to amplify their voices, which is online here.

Library Project

While I was in the Peace Corps, I collaborated with my school to transform two unused classrooms into a school library. We received grant funding from the Peace Corps Partnership Program and a small donation of books from the US Embassy’s Regional English Language Office. The library opened in 2013.

Reusable Menstrual Pad Project

Another project I worked on as part of my Peace Corps service was a collaboration with Huru International to distribute reusable menstrual pad kits to 400 girls at two schools. The project inspired Catherine Njau to start the community organization Kuleana Group, which has distributed over 2600 kits to girls in 8 schools. Now, in order to distribute the pads more sustainably, the have started Waridi Reuseable Sanitary Pads to produce them locally.